Best Corded Drills

Review & Comparison, Last Update December 31, 2019
Corded drills are not as mobile as cordless drills. That being said, corded models are much more maneuverable, powerful, and versatile than cordless drills. The best corded drills will let you tackle any application and complete almost any job. ...Read more ...Read less
BEST 2019
PROS
CONS
OUR VERDICT
Type
Power
Speed
Chuck
Extras
Weight
Warranty
 
PROS

The mid-handle grip profile enables ergonomic hand positioning. The 3/8-inch all-metal ratcheting keyless chuck brings greater bit retention. The plastic case will make sure you don't damage the drill during transportation. The all ball-bearing construction will make sure the drill lasts despite the working conditions. 

CONS

There's no lock-on button. 

OUR VERDICT

The DeWALT DWD115K is pretty mean. At the same time, the drill's not noisy at all. The variable speed trigger is sensible but not too sensible, smoothly going from very slow to its absolute max speed within seconds. Also, this power tool never overheats thanks to the oversized fan.

detailed parameters
Type

Drill

Power

8 amps

Speed

0 - 2500 RPM

Chuck

3/8", keyless

Extras

Mid-handle grip design, belt hook, storage case included 

Weight

4.1 lbs

Warranty

3 years

PROS

The side-assist handle enables controlled and accurate drilling despite user experience. The 360-degree rotating auxiliary handle adds flexibility. The detachable depth rod will let you quickly determine how deep the bit should go to meet the task's requirements, translating to accurate depth measuring. 

CONS

The bits are difficult to replace. 

OUR VERDICT

The TACKLIFE PID01A will prove indispensable in the long run. You'll be able to hammer and drill. The drill's well-balanced and runs smoothly no matter the surface. It is great for various applications and trades. The model will be equally useful on the jobsite and around the house.

detailed parameters
Type

Hammer Drill

Power

6 amps

Speed

0 - 2800 RPM

Chuck

1/2", keyed

Extras

360° rotating auxiliary handle, lock-on button, drill bits set (12 pcs) and scaled depth gauge included

Weight

5.5 lbs

Warranty

2 years

PROS

The lock-on button lets you continuously drill without having to constantly press down the power button. The double-ended screwdriving bit doubles the drilling lifetime. It is able to cut and center without wandering. You won't have to pre-punch this bit. The bit's usable at both ends, perfect for drilling rivets or thread holes in thin-walled materials.

CONS

The cord's length is lacking. 

OUR VERDICT

The Black & Decker DR260C is an affordable drilling machine that you can always bring with you. You'll be able to tackle and complete various household projects. Plus, the drill's compact profile and lightweight build will let you access the tightest spaces and use the drill for hours.

detailed parameters
Type

Drill

Power

5.2 amps

Speed

0 - 1500 RPM

Chuck

3/8", keyless

Extras

On-board bit storage, lock-on button, double-ended screwdriving bit included

Weight

3.5 lbs

Warranty

2 years

PROS

The 1/2-inch keyed chuck accepts large diameter bits, so you'll be able to take advantage of diverse working areas and tackle various woodworking and cutting projects. The horizontal trigger above the main handle lets you switch between drilling and driving, so you shouldn't have any issues quickly going from inserting screws to drilling into various surfaces.

CONS

The drill is pretty loud. 

OUR VERDICT

The SKIL 6335-02 has enough torque for heavy jobs. The metal chuck will last. You'll be able to quickly swap the drill bits. The auxiliary front handle rotates 360 degrees, making this machine maneuverable and adaptable. The rubber-coated main handle is grippy and comfortable.

detailed parameters
Type

Drill

Power

7 amps

Speed

0 - 950 RPM

Chuck

1/2", keyed

Extras

360° rotating auxiliary handle, lock-on button

Weight

5 lbs

Warranty

1 year

PROS

The two-sleeve, keyless, 3/8-inch chuck will let you quickly and easily swap the bits. The belt hook that comes supplied with this corded drill will let you secure the drill while working, which is an underrated option when you're working in high places where there's no place to put this instrument. 

CONS

The model tends to overheat during use. 

OUR VERDICT

The PORTER-CABLE PC600D is everything that mid-range handheld corded drills should be. Its high-torque gear design makes the drill excellent for pilot hole drilling regarding deck building and/or frame construction, everyday metal and wood fabrication, and every other application that requires the corded drills' extended runtime.

detailed parameters
Type

Drill

Power

6.5 amps

Speed

0 - 2500 RPM

Chuck

3/8", keyless

Extras

Belt hook, lock-on button

Weight

4 lbs

Warranty

3 years

DEWALT DWD115K

Heavy-Duty Applications

The DeWALT DWD115K can take the heat. First things first, its 8-amp motor will let you tackle relatively heavy-duty applications. You'll be able to complete various drilling and fastening projects without breaking two sweats. More often than not, the drill will feel right at home roofing and decking for hours on end.

At the same time, the model's variable speed trigger will let you choose anywhere between 1 and 2500 RPM, so you'll have no issues not only with around-the-home tasks but also light jobsite work. In most ways, this is the most powerful drill within this lineup.

Of course, the build and design of this power tool come first. Measuring 13.1 x 12.8 x 3.4 inches, the drill is neither too large nor especially compact. We can also extend this sentiment towards the model's 4.1-pound weight.

We've seen more lightweight drills but that extra pound won't make any difference, so you should be able to drill for hours without feeling too much hand fatigue. Plus, those more lightweight drills rarely deliver as much power and performance as this power tool, so the weight is actually pretty modest here.

The drill looks pretty good, provided you don't mind the company's trademark yellow and black color scheme. The paintwork is solid and the plastic housing is surprisingly rugged and durable. You won't have to be especially gentle with this drill, which is nice considering its heavy-duty dispositions.

Review of DEWALT DWD115K 3/8-Inch Variable Speed Reversible

All Ball-Bearing Construction

The relatively lightweight design wouldn't make any difference if the handle wasn't comfortable enough. Fortunately, that's not the case here.

The mid-handle grip profile makes this corded drill as convenient and practical as they come. Enabling ergonomic hand positioning, this mid-handle design lets you drill however you want without twisting the wrist. At the same time, the rubber inserts on the handle increase control and comfort, providing you with improved command over the drill.

Apart from that, the 3/8-inch all-metal ratcheting keyless chuck brings greater bit retention, making sure that the drill is able to provide long-term performance despite the load. Of course, the all ball-bearing construction works even more towards that goal, providing excellent durability and maintaining the drill's condition for years to come.

Setting the drill aside, there's also the belt hook that will let you free your hands whenever necessary and the storage case that will let you transport the drill with ease.

Bottom line, the DeWALT DWD115K is pretty mean. At the same time, the drill's not noisy at all. The variable speed trigger is sensible but not too sensible, smoothly going from very slow to its absolute max speed within seconds. Also, this power tool never overheats thanks to the oversized fan. It is up there with the best corded drills in the product's price range.

DEWALT DWD115K 3/8-Inch Variable Speed Reversible in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

TACKLIFE PID01A

Hammer and Drill

The TACKLIFE PID01A is the most versatile power tool on this list. The difference here is that this thing can hammer and drill. Using that massive orange bottom on the top, you'll be able to switch between drilling and hammering.

Needless to say, the drilling function will let you drill holes on steel plates and wood, while the hammer one provides much greater impact, making the drilling job more efficient on walls and masonry. This power tool won't be able to penetrate reinforced concrete walls but that's about it.

In addition to the variable speed trigger that these corded drills usually come equipped with, the model also features a variable speed knob. You'll be able to use these to set the right drilling/hammering speed for different applications. The power tool is able to go from 0 to 2800 RPM, so you'll be able to tackle pretty much any task.

Meanwhile, the lock-on button will make sure to reduce hand fatigue that inevitably comes when you work for hours on end. Also, the forward and reverse switch makes this tool even more convenient because you're able to immediately tighten or loosen screws.

Review of TACKLIFE PID01A 1/2-Inch Electric Hammer Drill

Controlled and Accurate Drilling

Considering that this hammer drill was designed to handle, its 5.5-pound build is really lightweight, enough to ensure easy operation and less fatigue through those long drilling tasks.

At the same time, the drill's compact design, adding up to 10.2 x 2.6 x 7.5 inches, translates to comfortable use and lets you easily access tight spaces. Moreover, the side-assist handle enables controlled and accurate drilling despite user experience.

The 360-degree rotating auxiliary handle takes the cake though, adding flexibility and offering the best, most comfortable grip. On the other side, there's the sturdy and durable metal chuck that lets you change many different drill bits with ease. Just keep in mind that the max chuck diameter this drill accepts is 1/2 inches (13 mm).

In addition to the drill, the people behind this product send you 12 different bits, so you'll be able to tackle variable applications right away. These bits come in different sizes and are made from different materials, letting you drill into various materials too, including wood, plastic, concrete, metal, and masonry. The black bag that comes with the package enables easy storage and collection.

Last but not least, the detachable depth rod will let you quickly determine how deep the bit should go to meet the task's requirements, translating to accurate depth measuring.

In short, the ACKLIFE PID01A will prove indispensable in the long run. The drill's well-balanced and runs smoothly no matter the surface. It is great for various applications and trades. Being the strongest drill on this list, the model will be equally useful on the jobsite and for home use.

TACKLIFE PID01A 1/2-Inch Electric Hammer Drill in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


 

Black & Decker DR260C

Access Tight Spaces for Woodworking

The Black & Decker DR260C won't be able to tussle with the biggest corded drills out there. We're not holding that against this product though. Considering its price tag, the model's competition should be residing within the budget price bracket yet its specs and performance match most mid-range drills.

First and foremost, this drilling machine is unusually compact, measuring 10.8 x 3.6 x 10.2 inches and barely reaching 3.5 pounds on the weight scale. As you'd imagine, these numbers mean that you'll easily be able to reach and access tight spaces and will have no issues wielding this compact little machine for hours without feeling tired.

Setting these measurements aside, let's review the drill's key features. As far as we're concerned, the product's keyless chuck is probably what sells this budget corded drill the most. You won't have to tighten and/or loosen the jaws to remove/place the drill bits. In other words, you'll be able to quickly and easily change the bits.

At the same time, the variable speed trigger will let you choose anywhere between 0 and 1500 revolutions per minute. That max speed won't be enough to drill into steel but you'll have no issues with metal, plastic, and wood.

Because you're able to control the machine's speed while carrying out drilling, the model allows you to streamline different tasks and make these tasks as easy and achievable as possible.

Review of Black & Decker DR260C Powerful and Compact

Lock-On Button

The 5.2-amp motor won't let you tackle big-time jobsite tasks. Having said that, the motor will provide enough juice for most around-the-house projects. The lock-on button's an excellent addition to the machine because you'll be able to drill without having to constantly press down the power button.

The double-ended screwdriving bit that comes supplied with the drill deserves some highlight too. First, the bit doubles the drilling lifetime. It is able to cut and center without wandering. You won't have to pre-punch this bit. Needless to say, the bit's usable at both ends, perfect for drilling rivets or thread holes in thin-walled materials.

Finally, the on-board bit storage compartment lets you hide and quickly access screwdriving bits, so you won't have to carry them separately.

Long story short, the Black & Decker DR260C is an affordable drilling machine that you can always bring with you. You'll be able to tackle and complete various household projects. Plus, the drill's compact profile will let you access the tightest spaces.

Black & Decker DR260C Powerful and Compact in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


VIDEO
Black and Decker 3/8 In Drill/Driver Unboxing | Model DR260C
 

SKIL 2/1/6335

Side-Assist Handle

The SKIL 6335-02 is as unapologetic as these corded power drills come. The model's 7-amp motor will be able to handle the toughest applications. You'll have no issues drilling holes and inserting screws into soft materials like wood and plastic.

As far as the model's build is concerned, there's not much here that we haven't seen before. Reaching five pounds on the weight scale, this drill is fairly lightweight, although we've seen and reviewed lighter drills before. The whole thing measures 13.2 x 10 x 3.2 inches, making this machine relatively compact, compact enough to access most hard-to-reach areas.

The drill has its flaws. First, it is pretty loud. The machine's not that much more loud than most corded drills but there's definitely some room for improvement present here. Although the weight is unevenly distributed, the side-assist handle cancels this flaw. Also, providing extra balance and control, this front handle makes sure you're able to keep the drill stable through the toughest tasks.

At the same time, the rubber-coated main handle is soft yet grippy, lessening hand fatigue and letting you comfortably control the machine for hours on end.

The variable speed trigger is pretty standard, letting you select anywhere between 0 and 900 revolutions per minute to match the speed with the task at hand. Of course, 900 RPM is nothing to write home about, so you probably won't be able to drill into metal surfaces.

Review of SKIL 2/1/6335 1/2-Inch Corded Drill

Rotating 360 Degrees

The 1/2-inch keyed chuck accepts large diameter bits, so you'll be able to take advantage of diverse working areas and tackle various woodworking and cutting projects.

The horizontal trigger above the main handle lets you switch between drilling and driving, so you shouldn't have any issues quickly going from inserting screws to drilling into various surfaces.

The manufacturers' didn't forget about the lock-on button, which's great because without this button you're forced to continuously squeeze the power button to make the machine work as necessary.

All things considered, the SKIL 6335-02 has enough torque for heavy jobs. The metal chuck will last. You'll be able to quickly swap the drill bits. The auxiliary front handle rotates 360 degrees, making this machine maneuverable and adaptable. Sure, the product has its downsides but there's enough here to make these downsides barely relevant. Plus, the price makes more than enough sense to justify the purchase.

SKIL 2/1/6335 1/2-Inch Corded Drill in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

PORTER-CABLE PC600D

Smooth and Consistent

The PORTER-CABLE PC600D is an affordable handheld drill for small/light projects.

We're not saying that this drill won't be able to tackle demanding applications though. On the contrary, its 6.5-amp motor will have no issues drilling and driving into soft metals, wood, plastic, probably even concrete and masonry.

Apart from that, the basically obligatory variable trigger goes from 0 to 2500 revolutions per minute, offering the right speed for any and every task. The trigger is smooth and consistent, so you should have no issues drilling and driving into different surfaces with accuracy and precision.

The idea that this corded drill is designed for small-time projects and applications mostly stems from the drill's compact and lightweight design. Measuring 10.9 x 3.2 x 10.9 inches, this nimble little machine will let you access various tight areas. The model barely weighs four pounds, so you won't be putting a huge strain on your hand.

In fact, the pistol-grip handle design will work wonders alleviating excess fatigue and strain put on the wrists and hands. You'll have no issues holding, maneuvering, and storing this compact drill. Plus, the rubber-coated handle will prevent blisters and let you comfortably hold and utilize this little machine.

Review of PORTER-CABLE PC600D Variable Speed

Secure the Drill

The two-sleeve, keyless, 3/8-inch chuck will let you quickly and easily swap the bits. Moreover, the keyless chuck also means excellent bit retention, translating into increased productivity and streamlined drilling.

At the same time, the belt hook that comes supplied with this corded drill will let you secure the drill while working, which is an underrated option when you're working in high places where there's no place to put this power tool.

Sometimes though, it is the little things that sell the product. For example, the relatively long 6-feet cord is not the flashiest feature on paper but that cord will make sure you're not as tied to the mains as you could be, which is nice.

Other times, it is the standard but necessary features, like the lock-on button that lets you continuously drill without holding the power button.

We've very few issues with this drill, the biggest being the fact that the drill overheats during use, so you'll have to take occasional breaks to extend the motor's lifespan.

Other than that, the PORTER-CABLE PC600D is everything that mid-range handheld corded drills should be. Its high-torque gear design makes the drill excellent for pilot hole drilling regarding deck building and/or frame construction, everyday metal and wood fabrication, and every other application that requires the corded drills' extended runtime.

PORTER-CABLE PC600D Variable Speed in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


 

What Is a Corded Drill?

Power drills usually fall under corded and cordless categories. As you would imagine, the difference between these power tools lies with the cord (or lack thereof) and power supply.

Of course, cordless drills can be more convenient at times. You can take them anywhere without worrying about where the nearest AC outlet is. At the same time, these cordless models are almost always bulkier and heavier. Their lifespan is limited and the power restrictions go without saying.

Corded drills, on the other hand, are usually much more powerful, leaner, and more lightweight than their cordless counterparts. Sure, they're also generally noisier, less convenient, and far less mobile.

We're not saying that one group's better than the other, however, we would stick with corded models seven or eight times out of ten. At the very least, the size makes too much difference. The usually nimble and compact corded drills let you access the tightest spots, whereas bulky, oversized cordless drills will seldom let you do so.

As good as these drills are when it comes to drilling into different relatively soft surfaces, they're no match for hammer drills and demolition drills in terms of pulverizing holes in brick and concrete, so consider these if that sounds more like something you're looking/need to do.

What Features to Compare

Power

Power tools have to be powerful, right? Well, yes and no. Power is relative. More often than not, these drills incorporate motors that clock somewhere between 5 and 8 amps. The drills that are unable to clock above 5.5-6 amps will have no troubles drilling into wood, plastic, and various soft surfaces but, more often than not, won't be able to penetrate harder materials like most metals. Drills that feature 7- to 8-amp motors, on the other hand, easily penetrate concrete, masonry, and most metals.

Speed

Speed matters just as much as the motor's amperage. First and foremost, different tasks/applications require different speeds, so the bigger the speed range, the more versatile the drill is. Generally speaking, these corded drills come fitted with variable speed triggers that you can use to choose and lock the desired speed. These drills usually go from 0 to 1500 revolutions per minute, although sometimes they're able to reach as high as 3000 RPM, letting you drive and drill with ease and precision. Because you're only able to access these settings using the speed trigger, how smooth and consistent that trigger is and should be cannot be overestimated.

Chuck

That's always the case with drills. More often than not, drills these days incorporate keyless chucks. That makes sense considering that these chucks enable enhanced bit retention and let you easily change the bits. The downside is that keyless chucks are usually more expensive and can only rotate clockwise, meaning that keyed chucks have merits too.

Size and Weight

These determine the drill's worth/value as much as the machine's features and performance. The size will determine how comfortable the drill is and whether you're able to use the tool with one hand. The size will also determine whether you'll be able to access certain tight spaces. The weight will tell you whether you'll have issues holding and maneuvering the drill for extended periods of time.

Of course, the drills' design/build matters too because, sometimes, even the most lightweight power tools can feel heavy and uncomfortable because the handle is inconvenient and the whole profile is impractical.

Extras

There are many features that go under this category. For starters, corded drills these days usually feature a lock-on button that lets you continuously drill without having to hold the power button. Apart from that, these drills often come supplied with belt hooks to secure the tool when you're working in high places. There are also storage cases and bits that sometimes come with the package and, as you would imagine, increase the product's value too.

Impact Drills/Drivers vs. Hammer Drills

Drills, impact drills, impact drivers, hammer drills, impact wrenches, sometimes these power tools sound the same. That's because these instruments aren't always that different after all. In fact, these names are often interchangeable. That's not always the case though. Here, we will focus primarily on the differences between impact drills/drivers and hammer drills.

Hammer Drills

First and foremost, hammer drills are designed to pulverize holes in brick, granite, concrete, marble, and other materials like that. Despite the name, these drills are not necessarily manufactured and produced for drilling. Plus, there are regular hammer drills and rotary hammers. The latter are usually much more powerful. They're also bulkier (size-wise) and weigh more than standard hammer drills. 

Inside these drills, there's always some hammering mechanism (the exact mechanism will vary depending on the hammer drill type) that basically pounds the bit forward. This mechanism lets these hammer drills pulverize their way through materials like concrete and masonry. Again, more often than not, these machines are designed for making holes in tough materials. At the same time, you can use them to drive different fasteners into concrete, so the drill part makes at least some sense.

Appearance-wise, hammer drills are often indistinguishable from impact drills on the surface level. Having said that, these hammer models are usually bigger and their barrels are almost always longer. More often than not, hammer drills incorporate three-jaw chucks, though there are exceptions to this rule.

Impact Drills

First things first, impact drills and impact drivers are the same things, the difference is the name alone. These drivers are very different from hammer drills. You use them for driving screws and/or loosening various fasteners into different materials. Of course, you can also use these power tools to drill holes, hence the interchangeable drill/driver term.

There are occasionally some differences between these drills/drivers though. Standard power drills sometimes get grouped with these tools but, even though all impact drills/drivers are power drills, not all power drills are impact drills/drivers.

Sounds somewhat confusing, right? Well, the difference here is that all these drills/drivers will use the motor's rotary power to drive the screw forward. However, impact drivers can also use percussive power to drive different fasteners forward, which is something that standard power drills are unable to do.

When the motor's usually high torque is insufficient, the hammering mechanism enters the scene. Using both rotary and percussion power, these drivers are able to handle bigger/longer fasteners.

As far as appearance is concerned, these impact drills/drivers are usually stubbier than hammer drills but much more compact.

Of course, at the end of the day, it is all about application. If you're looking to do masonry work, then a hammer drill is the right choice for you. On the other hand, if you need to drive fasteners and remove corroded screws/nuts/bolts, an impact drill/driver will fit that bill much better.

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Publish Date: 2019-12-31 13:42:17