Best All-in-One Touchscreen Computers

Review & Comparison, Last Update June 23, 2020
All-in-one touchscreen computers are elegant, uncluttered, and, from certain perspectives, ingenious computing solutions that different designers, developers, and editors can benefit from. The best all-in-one touchscreen computers are capable, full-featured machines that can even compete with standard desktop PCs. ...Read more ...Read less
BEST 2020
PROS
CONS
OUR VERDICT
Screen
Performance and Memory
OS
Interfaces
Peripherals
Warranty
 
PROS

The screen can be tilted, starting at -5 degrees and reaching +25 degrees. The diecast aluminum frame, thanks to the satin finish, comes scratch-resistant, maintaining its polished appearance. The speakers are covered with fabric, ensuring excellent acoustic transmission. 

CONS

The storage space is limited. 

OUR VERDICT

The newest HP Pavilion, with its clean lines, polished accents, and an all-white profile, looks much more elegant than people have come to expect from AIO systems that have nothing to do with Apple. Combining style and substance, this is one mean computing machine.

detailed parameters
Screen

23.8", Full HD (1920x1080), Touchscreen

Performance and Memory

Processor: Intel® Core™ i5-8400T (Up to 3.3 GHz)

RAM: 12 GB

Memory: 256 GB SSD

Graphics card: Intel UHD Graphics 630

OS

Windows 10 Home

Interfaces

2 x USB Type-C, 3 x USB Type-A, 2 x HDMI, 1 x LAN port, Headphone and mic combo jack, SD card slot

Peripherals

Wi-Fi, BT, Webcam, Built-in speakers, Keyboard and mouse included

Warranty

1 year

PROS

The CD/DVD optical drive will let you playback old movies, boot drivers for legacy devices, browse old photos, and more. The anti-glare coating on the screen will let you work without shutting the blinds. The IPS display will provide wide (178 degrees) viewing angles and accurate colors. 

CONS

There's no SD/Micro SD card slot. 

OUR VERDICT
This AIO system from HP is nothing to sneeze at. Between the respectable screen, considerable storage space, ergonomic peripherals, and 16GB RAM setup, this comfortable yet speedy workhorse will increase productivity and enable comfortable entertainment consumption.
detailed parameters
Screen

23.8", Full HD (1920x1080), Touchscreen

Performance and Memory

Processor: Intel® Core™ i3-8130U (Up to 3.4 GHz)

RAM: 16 GB

Memory: 256 GB SSD + 1 TB HDD

Graphics card: Intel UHD Graphics 620

OS

Windows 10 Home

Interfaces

4 x USB Type-A, 1 x HDMI, 1 x LAN port, Headphone and mic combo jack

Peripherals

Wi-Fi, BT, Webcam, Built-in speakers, DVD optical drive, Keyboard and mouse included

Warranty

1 year

PROS

With the system's excellent 8th generation i5 CPU and 16GB RAM setup, you can juggle almost countless demanding apps and have like 50 Chrome tabs opened without the system lagging at all. Between the 512GB SSD and 1TB HDD, you can edit videos without deleting the unused footage every single week.

CONS

Some find the speakers a little quiet. 

OUR VERDICT

The Lenovo IdeaCentre 520 claims its place among the most versatile all-in-one touchscreen computers. Thanks to the massive, 27-inch, WQHD screen and its 1440p native resolution, people whose work revolves around editing images and videos will be able to accomplish more in less time.

detailed parameters
Screen

27", WQHD (2560x1440), Touchscreen

Performance and Memory

Processor: Intel® Core™ i5-8400T (Up to 3.3 GHz)

RAM: 16 GB

Memory: 512 GB SSD + 1 TB HDD

Graphics card: Intel UHD Graphics 630

OS

Windows 10 Home

Interfaces

1 x USB Type-C, 5 x USB Type-A, 2 x HDMI, 1 x LAN port, Headphone and mic combo jack, SD card slot (16 GB card included)

Peripherals

Wi-Fi, BT, Webcam, Built-in speakers, DVD optical drive, Keyboard and mouse included

Warranty

1 year

PROS

Offering 5 USB ports (4 x USB Type-A and 1 x USB Type-C), this PC lets you connect as many peripherals as necessary without removing anything. The feet raise the screen, allowing you to put the keyboard underneath it and save even more space on the desk. 

CONS

The webcam is not great at streaming/recording with insufficient ambient light. 

OUR VERDICT

The Dell Inspiron 24 5000 5490 comes featuring an InfinityEdge display, a robust soundbar, and the cleanest, most streamlined form factor that will easily match most spaces, from modern offices to contemporary homes, keeping the workspace neat and uncluttered.

detailed parameters
Screen

23.8", Full HD (1920x1080), Touchscreen

Performance and Memory

Processor: Intel® Core™ i3-10110U (Up to 4.1 GHz)

RAM: 8 GB

Memory: 1 TB HDD

Graphics card: Intel UHD Graphics

OS

Windows 10 Home

Interfaces

1 x USB Type-C, 4 x USB Type-A, 2 x HDMI, 1 x LAN port, Headphone and mic combo jack, SD card slot

Peripherals

Wi-Fi, BT, Webcam, Built-in speakers, Keyboard and mouse included

Warranty

1 year

PROS

The screen's IPS panel will make sure the colors are reproduced with great accuracy, the blacks come out dark, and the whites are coming at you bright. The MaxxAudio™ speakers will ensure the audio remains consistent at all volume levels. 

CONS

The stand is a touch unstable. 

OUR VERDICT

The Dell 3475 is sufficient, that's the word we're going with. Even though its hardware is passable at best and the appearance is a little bland, this is a dependable machine that will let you work even with the most system-intensive programs.

detailed parameters
Screen

23.8", Full HD (1920x1080), Touchscreen

Performance and Memory

Processor: AMD Stoney™ A9-9425 (Up to 3.1 GHz)

RAM: 8 GB

Memory: 1 TB HDD

Graphics card: AMD Radeon R5

OS

Windows 10 Home

Interfaces

4 x USB Type-A, 1 x HDMI, 1 x LAN port, Headphone and mic combo jack, SD card slot

Peripherals

Wi-Fi, BT, Webcam, Built-in speakers, Keyboard and mouse included

Warranty

1 year

HP Pavilion

A Perfect Blend of Form and Function

The newest HP Pavilion AIO touchscreen computer is one executive-looking rig. When most AIO systems are choosing gray and black, this one, with its all-white housing, stands out from the pack, appearing much more elegant than its competition. A perfect blend of form and function, the model's looking awesome from all angles. Its ultraslim profile adopts a diecast aluminum frame, satin finish, and steel plate base, providing structural integrity and a sleek aesthetic.

Pivoting towards the "function" part, you can adjust the screen, tilting between -5 and +25 degrees and enabling comfortable viewing from any position. Flipping the screen, you'll find multiple ports, all strategically placed around the back so that you can keep the workspace neat and not cluttered.

Flipping back, the front houses pretty impressive speakers. Fabric-covered, these speakers provide noiseless acoustic transmission, keeping the audio output crisp and authentic. Also, custom-tuned by B&O Play, the model's speakers are excellent at separating lows, mids, and highs, making sure that the audio is coming out rich and layered.

Above the screen is the webcam. AIO computers are not complete without integrated webcams, but this one also adds a pop-up shutter that you can use the hide the camera, knowing that no one can spy on you, even assuming that they can hack the system.

Before discussing the hardware, one interesting thing about this rig is the Intel® Optane™ system, learning and recording the user's computing patterns and adapting to his needs, making the system even more responsive than it is from the get-go.

Review of HP Pavilion 23.8" FHD IPS Touchscreen All-in-One Desktop (Intel Core i5-8400T, | 12GB RAM | 256GB SSD)

All-in-One Business Computer

Hardware-wise, this setup leaves mixed feelings. On the one hand, the Intel® Core™ i5-8400T CPU is pretty great, with its impressive single-core performance and 3.3GHz boost. Its multi-core performance, while lagging behind the line's i7 successors, is also above-average, enabling comfortable data mining, 3D rendering (though the integrated GPU will bottleneck these endeavors at times), running compression and decompression algorithms, and more. But the 256GB SSD setup alone is an odd choice. Sure, you can upgrade, even though, with AIO computers, it is not hassle-free. Still, not adding at least one HDD makes zero sense because they cost nothing these days and an extra terabyte would have gone a long way improving the system's storage capacity.

All things considered, the HP Pavilion 23.8", despite its shortcomings in the storage capacity department, does not disappoint, not in the slightest, successfully matching looks with performance.

HP Pavilion 23.8" FHD IPS Touchscreen All-in-One Desktop (Intel Core i5-8400T, | 12GB RAM | 256GB SSD) in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

HP (2020)

Even Discs Will Do

With this AIO touchscreen computer, the folk at HP are doing something interesting. What's the interesting part? Well, there's more than one, but you have to start somewhere and the DVD optical drive is as good of a place as any to do that.

Is it necessarily necessary? No, not really. But optical drives are practically given away for free nowadays and, truth be told, we believe that most systems can benefit from them. Sure, nobody uses discs these days, not frequently anyway. Nevertheless, from time to time, you'll need to boot something from an old-school disc, maybe drivers, maybe an old photos collection, we can picture multiple scenarios where the drive can prove useful.

While we're praising this tiny little detail, one could make an argument that it is an insignificant gimmick and what matters is the hardware. Well, fair enough, hardware matters, we will not pretend otherwise. But this machine is not trailing behind on the hardware front as well. Yes, the Intel® Core™ i3-8130U processing unit does not match the i5 line's multi-core performance, let alone the i7 series'. But, even 20 years into a new millennium, most programs are still not great at utilizing more than 4 cores, so this CPU will seldom disappoint. Aside from basic, everyday computing, the processor will enable financial and scientific modeling, video encoding, and more. Considering that, not unlike most AIO touchscreen computers, this rig is adopting an integrated graphics card, this processing unit will not bottleneck anything that the GPU can handle, we can give you that much.

Review of HP (2020) 23.8" FHD 1080P Touchscreen All-in-One Desktop (Intel Core i3-8130U | 16GB RAM | 256GB SSD + 1TB HDD)

Three-Sided Borderless Frame

AIO touchscreen desktop computers usually bank a considerable amount on the screen, hence the "touchscreen" part, even more so than standard AIOs. On that note, the model's 23.8" 1080p screen deserves very little criticism. Its anti-glare treatment is quite effective, letting you work even with the sun hitting right at the screen. The three-sided borderless frame makes the on-screen action more immersive, so the display will also enable comfortable streaming. Since this is an IPS panel, the viewing angles are nothing to complain about (178 degrees, standard IPS performance), the contrast ratio is pretty wide, and the colors are accurate.

Last but not least, from the storage angle, this system is offering both 256GB SSD and 1TB HDD, so you can store as much multimedia content on this machine as you want without running out anytime soon.

When all is said (and little is done), this AIO touchscreen machine from HP offers ample storage space, ergonomic peripherals, an above-average screen, and 16GB RAM, all without raising the price above $1,000, easily warranting its place on the list.

HP (2020) 23.8" FHD 1080P Touchscreen All-in-One Desktop (Intel Core i3-8130U | 16GB RAM | 256GB SSD + 1TB HDD) in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

Lenovo IdeaCentre 520

Selling Itself

The Lenovo IdeaCentre 520 lands among AIO computers that sell themselves. Aside from the integrated graphics card that all non-premium AIO touchscreen computers are adopting, this system compromises nothing. We can start anywhere and we would already be talking about its advantages relative to most AIO machines within this price bracket. To name one, there's the 27", WQHD screen. With its native 2560 x 1440p resolution, this screen reproduces much more detailed visuals compared to its Full HD, 1080p peers, showcasing games and movies with stunning clarity, precise image expression, and subtle imagery. With the increased screen real-estate, graphic designers, photo and video editors, and even different engineers and developers can accomplish more within the same timeframe, streamlining productivity and, with the 10-point multitouch display, making the most complex minute tasks less exhausting.

Setting aside the screen, we can start unwrapping hardware. The first suspect is the Intel® Core™ i5-8400T processing unit, lending you excellent single-core performance and respectable multi-core utility. Within its price point, this is easily the best CPU, there's nothing we can say against it without comparing the unit against much more expensive components.

Working alongside this respectable CPU will be the 16GB RAM setup, which's nothing less than huge. Delivering so much RAM, the system lets you manage the most sizable databases and the biggest, most complex spreadsheets. Greedy apps like Photoshop that usually consume RAM like nobody's business will not present any challenges to this system. You can easily run multiple system-intensive apps and juggle 40+ Chrome tabs without suffocating the machine.

Review of Lenovo IdeaCentre 520 27" WQHD Touchscreen All-in-One Desktop (Core i5-8400T | 16GB RAM | 512GB SSD + 1TB HDD)

Huge Storage Facilities

You'd presume that, with such an awesome screen, 16GB RAM, great CPU, and all that, the model's storage capacity would be sacrificed. Yet, the opposite is the case. First, the machine brings 512GB SSD, loading the operating system within 5-6 seconds and the heaviest apps within ~2-3. Second, like the SSD wasn't enough, this bad boy is stacking 1TB HDD atop the solid-state device, offering more storage capacity than, frankly, most users need.

Things get a little hairy with the speakers, them being a tad quiet. But, besides that, the Lenovo IdeaCentre 520 is the most complete, well-rounded AIO machine. Aside from everything we have examined and outlined above, there's also a DVD optical drive and the pop-up webcam that you can hide, making sure that spying on you through that camera is impossible.

Lenovo IdeaCentre 520 27" WQHD Touchscreen All-in-One Desktop (Core i5-8400T | 16GB RAM | 512GB SSD + 1TB HDD) in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

Dell Inspiron 24 5000 5490

Hitting and Missing

The Dell Inspiron 24 5000 5490 fires on all cylinders but, at times, misses. Taking the price into account, this model's not lagging behind most all-in-one touchscreen computers within its class, even though certain moments are questionable. The first moment pertains to the hardware subject. Sure, when you're paying less than $900, expecting both 16GB RAM and an above-average solid-state device is a little greedy, but not receiving both is a tad disappointing.

Even though most users will find the 8GB RAM setup sufficient, there are some that could benefit from doubling the random-access memory, maybe those that keep countless Chrome tabs opened simultaneously, maybe those that manipulate heavy photo- and video-editing software, maybe those that work with large databases.

Again, we can forgive the modest RAM setup but adding at least 256GB SSD to the model's 1TB HDD would have been an awesome improvement, reducing the load times so that you're not wasting precious minutes daily staring at loading screens.

But, as much as we're complaining about these two, nobody buys AIO touchscreen computers expecting ~high-end performance, not at this price anyway. Before anything else, people buy these machines because they're great at matching form, fit, and function, with this product fitting the same mold.

Review of Dell Inspiron 24 5000 5490 24" FHD Touchscreen All-in-one Computer (Intel Core i3-10110U | 8GB RAM | 1TB HDD )

Clean, Sharp, Seamless

While the pictures are already painting something, you cannot quite tell how cool-looking this device is without holding one. For one, the pictures do not do the space-efficient yet stable and elegant feet justice. The forward-firing soundbar appears a little modest on them too, even though the 'bar is anything but modest. With the feet raising the screen, you can even hide the keyboard underneath it, saving extra space. The sleek back is not hiding the ports, keeping them accessible yet the desk clean and uncluttered. On top, there is the company's pop-up cam, remaining hidden 'till you need it. Full disclosure - the camera is not necessarily excellent at streaming and recording when the ambient light is limited, but the same can be said about most budget webcams.

From where we're standing, this is one elegant setup. And even though we have criticized its hardware, the most important one, being the Intel® Core™ i3-10110U CPU, is no joke, with its turbo boost reaching 4.1 GHz and offering single-core performance that twice more expensive processors can seldom match, let alone exceed.

In short, the Dell Inspiron 24 5000 5490 is an attractive-looking all-in-one PC, with decent specs, 5 USB ports, and Bluetooth 5.0 module delivering an improved wireless range and data throughput.

Dell Inspiron 24 5000 5490 24" FHD Touchscreen All-in-one Computer (Intel Core i3-10110U | 8GB RAM | 1TB HDD ) in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

Dell (I3475)

The MaxxAudio™ Treatment

The Dell 3475 is the least expensive all-in-one PC within this selection and also the least impressive, even though this is an awesome machine compared to its contemporaries coming at comparable prices. Viewing its specs through the price lens, things are looking pretty good. First things first, the 23.8" screen boasts an IPS panel, so the viewing angles are excellent, stretching 178 degrees without visually distorting the image. The colors are accurate and vibrant, coming at you with precise image expression without appearing washed-out. As always, the contrast ratio does not quite match VA panels but runs circles around TN monitors, making the blacks dark and the whites bright.

Aside from the speakers sitting beneath the display, the bezels are narrow, making the on-screen action more immersive. The anti-glare coating should not go unnoticed too, allowing you to use the PC even sunlight staring directly at the screen. Its touchscreen capabilities are relatively standard, recognizing 10 discrete touchpoints and letting you manipulate as many as 10 separate elements on the screen. Though its appearance does not inspire much more than a shoulder shrug, the model's compact footprint occupies almost no space, measuring 14 x 22 x 2 inches. Even the stand is barely noticeable, which can prove an issue sometimes since the reduced size also makes the stand a little unstable.

There's nothing unstable about the webcam though, streaming and recording HD footage so that you can video chat with friends and have them enjoy your lovely face all crisp and detailed. There's also nothing unstable about the aforementioned speakers, adopting the company's signature MaxxAudio™ tech that can create an honest space perception and keep the audio consistent even at high volume settings.

Review of Dell (I3475) 23.8" FHD Touchscreen All-in-One All-In-One Desktop (AMD A9-9425 | 8GB DDR4 | 1TB HDD)

Sufficient Hardware

From the hardware perspective, the Dell 3475 has its limitations. Between the AMD Stoney™ A9-9425 CPU, integrated AMD Radeon R5 GPU, and 8GB RAM setup, the machine will not be pulling off any miracles. Everyday browsing? Sure. Basic computing? No sweat. Anything above that? Well, things can get rocky, but even the most gluttonous applications should be fine as long as you're not running more than 2-3 at the same time.

Add the SD card slot, 4 USB ports, all the standard interfaces including an HDMI port, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth modules, and the complementary peripherals and you have the Dell 3475, in all its modest glory.

Dell (I3475) 23.8" FHD Touchscreen All-in-One All-In-One Desktop (AMD A9-9425 | 8GB DDR4 | 1TB HDD) in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

What Is an All-in-One Touchscreen Computer?

Computers, laptops, phones, tablets, smart TVs, smart watches, assistant speakers, the list can go on and on. Can we see the appeal? Certainly. But we also do not want to invest in 15 different electronics, the fatigue is getting real, we're getting tired, too many devices, too much time wasted worrying about them.

All-in-one computers cannot solve this issue but they can mitigate the damages. Unlike standard computers, they're housing everything inside the monitor, keeping the desk uncluttered but also giving you much more screen real-estate than laptops. Plus, as the "touchscreen" part suggests, these computers can also aid creative professionals, education projects, even entertainment.

They're not the beefiest PCs, the hardware can seldom run triple-A games. What they are, are effective, efficient, reliable workstations that you can unpack and get to work without assembling and installing anything. Now, even though the touchscreen displays can usually manage, pairing them with drawing tablets can do wonders for artists, so we would recommend looking into them too.

What Features to Compare

Screen

When you're talking about AIO touchscreen computers, the screen will be among the most important parts, right? With that in mind, the difference between standard monitors and these screens is practically nonexistent, so assuming that you know the parameters that generally determine the screen's worth, you should be able to choose an AIO system with the right screen. More often than not, the right screen will be adopting an IPS panel because that's usually the most well-rounded panel, offering high contrast ratios, accurate colors, wide viewing angles, etc. The right screen will also be at least 23.8 inches and with a Full HD (1920 x 1080p) native resolution. Because they're touchscreen displays, you want to make sure that the screen is able to register at least 8-10 separate touches at the same time. Last but not least, touchscreen monitors attract creative types and professions first and foremost, so an effective anti-glare treatment can prove invaluable, letting you work without taking the ambient light into account.

Hardware and Storage

All-in-one computers are still computers, so the hardware remains the same. Unless you start looking into high-end models, most AIO systems come equipped with an integrated graphics card, so taming the hottest gaming titles is not something you can expect them to do. No, these are primarily workstations, so the processing unit matters quite a lot but the graphics card seldom as much. Besides that, avoid models that are offering less than 8GB RAM because, these days, less than that will mean an almost nonexistent multitasking presence.

Storage-wise, cloud services are pushing out physical drives but some storage space will always remain necessary. The best all-in-one touchscreen computers will usually match 256-512GB SSD with ~1TB HDD, reducing the system's and the programs' load times and offering ample storage space.

Interfaces

Because AIO machines are packing almost everything you need inside the screen, you will be seldom connecting multiple devices/gadgets/peripherals to them. Still, at least a few USB ports, one HDMI port (so that you can connect a second monitor), a LAN port, and a 3.5mm jack will not hurt. Sometimes, they will even include an SD card slot, which's always nice, especially for people who are into photography.

Peripherals

Even budget all-in-one touchscreen computers are usually shipped with a complementary keyboard and a mouse. They also integrate Wi-Fi and Bluetooth modules, speakers, and a webcam, so you will not have to purchase anything separately.

The Great CPU vs GPU Debate

Users have been deciding between spending more dough on CPU or GPU as long as commercially available computers have been around, so quite some time now, let's just say that. The issue here is that we're not even talking about these components outperforming each other in separate categories, we're talking about them tussling within these categories.

For starters, the general consensus is that, as far as gaming is concerned, the graphics card is more important. Is that accurate? Well, generally speaking, yes, it is. But when you're speaking less generally, you cannot really claim that the GPU always inputs more than the processing unit. Sure, quick-moving, fast-paced games like first-person shooters, most sandbox games, sports simulators, and MOBAs are usually drawing more from the graphics card than they are from the processor, even though well-optimized games are utilizing both almost equally nowadays. Processing 2D and 3D graphics, mapping heavy textures, rendering polygons, mapping textures, the GPU is processing a considerable amount of information and the faster the card is able to process that information the higher the frame rate will be.

But the CPU is not just chilling there doing nothing in the meantime. No, sometimes, the processing unit is doing even more, especially when we're talking about MMORPGs and strategy games since the CPU is not only processing the artificial intelligence functionality of NPCs but also inputting every unit into the system and, with hundreds upon hundreds of units interacting on the screen at the same time (something that MMOs and strategy games often entail), the CPU is often working overtime.

We might be getting ahead of ourselves though. Before going into these details, we need to establish what these components are even contributing in the first place. The CPU, standing for central processing unit, is responsible for carrying out and controlling the different programs' instructions, performing input and output operations, basic arithmetic, algorithms, all that complicated stuff. People also refer to this processing unit as the computers' heart, core, or brain since, without one, computers do not function at all.

The graphics processing unit (abbreviated as GPU) and also referred to as a graphics card, is a much more specialized electronic circuit, allowing the computer to create and render images, animations, and video in a reduced time span. Allowing the central processing unit to focus on other tasks, the GPU performs quick math calculations, managing and enhancing the computer's performance as it pertains to visual content.

But what's the core difference? Well, the CPU is using multiple cores, focusing on sequential processing, whereas the GPU is more about multitasking, featuring somewhere around 1,500 - 4,000 smaller cores calculating and controlling smaller threads/instructions.

So, aside from gaming, where and when are these two components more important? Generally speaking, anything that involves big data, image processing, and deep machine learning will ride the graphics card more than the CPU. 3D rendering will put both of these components to good use. But compiling programs, mining data, and running most compression and decompression algorithms are areas where the CPU will be more involved.

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Publish Date: 2020-06-23 08:58:25