Best OLED TVs

Review & Comparison, Last Update February 11, 2020
OLED TVs produce the visuals so fluid and smooth that you won't be able to go back to standard TVs when you try them. The best OLED TVs cost much more than those standard TVs but the infinite contrast ratio with the aforementioned smoothness and fluidity makes the price justifiable. ...Read more ...Read less
BEST 2020
PROS
CONS
OUR VERDICT
Size
Screen Resolution
Motion Rate
Smart TV
3D Support
Interfaces
Sound
Warranty
 
PROS

The X1 Extreme™ processing unit will be making every pixel as crisp as possible. The Reality Pro tech will work wonders upscaling dated content to 4K resolution, all while reducing screen noise. The black levels are superb even compared to the priciest OLED TVs. 

CONS

When using the feet, the TV seems somewhat unstable. 

OUR VERDICT

Sony BRAVIA XBR-65A8G is awesome even compared to most high-end OLED TVs. The company's TRILUMINOS™ tech will make sure the colors are rich and vivid yet realistic. The Android OS comes with built-in Chromecast, so you'll be able to stream from any Android smartphone onto the TV.

detailed parameters
Size

65" (55" also available) 

Screen Resolution

3840 x 2160

Motion Rate

120 Hz (MotionFlow™ XR technology)

Smart TV

Yes (Built-in Wi-Fi) 

3D Support

No 

Interfaces

Bluetooth, 3 x USB, 1 x Ethernet port (RJ-45), 4 x HDMI, 1 x Composite in, 1 x Optical out, 1 x Headphones jack, Ant. in 

Sound

40 W (2 speakers and 2 woofers)

Warranty

1 year 

PROS

The company's Magic Remote with Point, Click, Scroll, and Voice features will allow you to quickly and easily navigate the settings. The LG Voice Mate™ speech recognition tech will have no issues recognizing voice commands. The AI Brightness feature offsets OLED TVs' brightness issues. 

CONS

The preset display settings are pretty bad, so you will probably have to change them.

OUR VERDICT

The LG OLED65B9PUA is as complete as mid-range OLED TVs get. The AI ThinQ™ tech will let you switch between the TV's settings with no lags and freezes. You can use Google Assistant and Alexa to manage the screen. The minimalistic profile seamlessly blends into most spaces.

detailed parameters
Size

65" (55" and 77" also available) 

Screen Resolution

3840 x 2160

Motion Rate

120 Hz 

Smart TV

Yes (Built-in Wi-Fi) 

3D Support

No

Interfaces

Bluetooth, 3 x USB, 1 x Ethernet port (RJ-45), 4 x HDMI, 1 x Composite in, 1 x Optical out, Ant. in 

Sound

40 W (2 speakers and 2 woofers) 

Warranty

1 year 

PROS

The native 240 Hz motion rate with AMD's FreeSync™ tech will be able to ensure smooth gameplay, reducing motion jitter and choppy frames. Meanwhile, the Dynamic Black Equalizer feature will be making the darkest corners as visible as necessary to give you an advantage over less fortunate gamers. 

CONS

The remote is too basic. 

OUR VERDICT

The Samsung QN55Q80RAFXZA will be able to satisfy most customers, from movie buffs to gaming enthusiasts. Though pretty gimmicky, the company's Ambient Mode™ lets the TV mingle with various décors. At the same time, the gaming features allow this screen to double as an excellent high-end monitor.

detailed parameters
Size

55" (65", 75", and 82" also available)

Screen Resolution

3840 x 2160

Motion Rate

240 Hz 

Smart TV

Yes (Built-in Wi-Fi)

3D Support

No

Interfaces

Bluetooth, 2 x USB, 1 x Ethernet port (RJ-45), 4 x HDMI, 1 x Optical out, Ant. in 

Sound

40 W (4 speakers and 1 woofer) 

Warranty

1 year 

PROS

The Roku TV platform is intuitive and accessible but also venerable and unbiased. Because the platform has no ties to the biggest streaming services, you won't be force-fed anything. In fact, the platform will prioritize free content before subscription-based services like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime Video, and more.

CONS

The speakers are not especially loud. 

OUR VERDICT

As far as the price-performance ratio is concerned, the TCL 65R625 is easily up there with the best OLED TVs. The Quantum Dot filter makes the screen as bright as its more expensive competition but without producing especially noticeable haloing. The LEDs ensure vibrant colors.

detailed parameters
Size

65" (55" also available) 

Screen Resolution

3840 x 2160

Motion Rate

240 Hz 

Smart TV

Yes (Built-in Wi-Fi)

3D Support

No

Interfaces

1 x USB, 1 x Ethernet port (RJ-45), 4 x HDMI, 1 x Composite in., 1 x Optical out, 1 x Headphones jack, Ant. in 

Sound

16 W (2 speakers) 

Warranty

1 year 

PROS

The screen's excellent motion handling makes sure that action-packed scenes look smooth, while the dialogue scenes don't suffer from the soap opera effect. The Intelligent Audio feature elevates the mids and adds clarity to the dialogues.

CONS

The screen surface is very glossy. 

OUR VERDICT

The Samsung QN55Q60RAFXZA shows you what the company's flagship TV products are able to do, not necessarily matching these TVs' performance across the entire board but delivering where it matters most. Also, the screen is especially slim, ideal for wall-mounting.

detailed parameters
Size

55" (43", 49", 65", 75", and 82" also available)

Screen Resolution

3840 x 2160

Motion Rate

240 Hz 

Smart TV

Yes (Built-in Wi-Fi)

3D Support

No

Interfaces

Bluetooth, 2 x USB, 1 x Ethernet port (RJ-45), 4 x HDMI, 1 x Optical out, Ant. in 

Sound

20 W (2 speakers) 

Warranty

1 year 

Sony BRAVIA (XBR-65A8G)

It's All in the Details

The Sony BRAVIA XBR-65A8G is big time. Sure, the updated model is not necessarily inexpensive but that's what mid-range/high-end OLED TVs look and cost like.

The product fires and hits on all cylinders but the colors and contrast are probably what separates this TV from most flagship models first and foremost.

OLED models are always great from the contrast standpoint but this one's especially impressive, bringing those perfect black levels that output no light with black pixels, even when the other screen parts are lit up, producing what amounts to a pretty much infinite contrast ratio.

The colors look great too, accurate yet saturated. The leaves will be coming vivid green, the waters vibrant blue but not overblown. The TV will have no issues displaying tiny details like bark, even when the footage switches from direct sunlight to various shades.

The reds this TV produces follow suit, somewhat lacking certain varied hues that high-end LCD TVs are able to generate but nothing that OLED models can beat. You'll be able to clearly see the shadow details against the flames without them appearing muddied.

All that being said, movies/series that incorporate primarily dark tones/shades is where this model truly shines. The TV will make black suits' contours and textures visible even against white shirts and lights. At the same time, the details will be preserved all across the board, meaning that no parts of the frame will appear washed out. Plus, the skin tones will remain natural, which is nice since OLED TVs can usually make them seem somewhat pale.

Review of Sony BRAVIA (XBR-65A8G) 65-Inch OLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model)

Looking Sleek

The Sony BRAVIA XBR-65A8G employs Android TV to handle its interface and all the connected features. What we have here is a full-featured system that will let you quickly and easily access various streaming services, from Netlif, Huli, and Amazon Prime Video to Google Play services, YouTube, Twitch, PlayStation Vue, Sling TV, and more.

The TV looks good; sleek, stylish, black. The bezels are pretty much non-existent. The feet are too slim though. When using these feet, the TV seems somewhat unstable. On the bright side, the feet's unassuming design pretty much disappears against the screen, further streamlining the device's already appearance.

Bottom line, the Sony BRAVIA XBR-65A8G is quite brilliant. The black levels are perfect. The color range is wide. The Android TV system is robust. Plus, the remote is pretty comfortable and intuitive.

Sony BRAVIA (XBR-65A8G) 65-Inch OLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model) in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


 

LG (OLED65B9PUA)

AI Brightness

The LG OLED65B9PUA is all about making the viewing experience as dynamic and engaging as possible.

Packing both HD SDR and 4K HDR sources, the TV will be reproducing impeccable black levels, top-notch contrast, excellent uniformity, and that off-angle viewing that people have come to expect from OLED TVs.

There are not too many TVs that we would choose over this one when viewing dimly lit scenes. You'll be able to separate and differentiate between various different black shades. The shadows will be highly detailed too, making sure they do not become crushed and pretty much impossible to discern.

Sure, as far as bright scenes are concerned, OLED TVs cannot dance with LCD models but this screen performs pretty well not only compared to its OLED peers but also to many mid-range LCD panels.

Partially, that's the case thanks to the Peak Brightness feature that works wonders boosting the SDR sources' light output when set to Cinema and Expert modes.

Of course, all TVs' brightest mode makes colors horribly inaccurate, so we would recommend setting this feature to medium, sometimes high.

The AI Brightness feature is awesome too, sensing the ambient lighting and automatically adjusting the image. That includes tweaking the HDR tone mapping, making the dark areas more digestible, so to speak.

Review of LG (OLED65B9PUA) 65-Inch OLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model)

Elevating the Gaming Experience

Color accuracy is not where the LG OLED65B9PUA drops the ball either. The ISF Expert and Cinema modes are accurate from the get-go and standard calibration makes them even better. The TV won't be bringing you visible banding and massive discoloration blocks that most LCD panels suffer from.

As much as these metrics sell the product, what separates this TV from most OLED models is its gaming-oriented tech. First, the 1ms response time and ~13ms input lag will enable the smoothest gameplay. Second, the variable refresh rate feature will reduce screen tearing to eliminate choppy visuals. Apart from that, the screen's G-Sync compatible, making the TV an excellent choice for people with Nvidia GPUs.

We don't have massive issues with the screen except that the preset display settings are pretty bad, so you will probably have to change them.

Other than that, the LG OLED65B9PUA is among the most versatile and complete OLED TVs we've looked at. It will be able to elevate the gaming experience. The TV will make most movies look absolutely stunning. Also, the product looks thing and elegant even compared to most high-end OLED models.

LG (OLED65B9PUA) 65-Inch OLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model) in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer


 

Samsung (QN55Q80RAFXZA) [Q80 Series]

Controlled LEDs

The Samsung QN55Q80RAFXZA all but redefines mid-range OLED models' limits. You'll be able to find hidden details throughout shadowy blacks as well as the most brilliant whites.

Before anything else, what makes that possible are the TV's eight controlled LEDs that adjust intelligently to make the blacks rich and the whites crisp.

There's also the model's Intelligent Mode that automatically adapts the picture brightness and sound, matching the room's conditions to make the viewing experience as enveloping yet comfortable as possible.

The 55-inch panel's Ultra HD 3840 x 2160 native resolution somewhat goes without saying since that's what most panels this size are packing these days.

At the same time, as unfortunate as it may be, most content that you'll be viewing won't be matching the aforementioned resolution.

That's alright though. The model's Quantum processor does an excellent job upscaling Full HD, HD, and even SDR content, adding sharp detail and refined colors to the upscaled picture.

OLED TVs' viewing angles are usually pretty good but not as good as IPS panels'. That's not the case here. The viewing angles that this device is packing are as wide as they get, ensuring the most vibrant visuals no matter where you sit. Plus, the screen makes sure to reduce glare.

Review of Samsung (QN55Q80RAFXZA) [Q80 Series] 55-Inch QLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model)

Real Game Enhancer

HDR in and of itself is nothing to write home about these days. That being said, you can write home about the TV's Quantum HDR 12X, ensuring the most seamless transition from the lightest to darkest colors, scene by scene, securing remarkable picture realism.

Not necessarily the model's biggest standout feature but the Ambient Mode that you can use to make a blank screen blend with the wall is pretty neat.

It is not as neat as the Real Game Enhancer feature though. Reducing tearing and stuttering, this feature ensures the smoothest visuals to make the entire gaming experience as engaging as possible. At the same time, the Dynamic Black Equalizer feature will make sure the darkest corners are visible enough, using detailed scene analysis to optimize the image quality.

Samsung's Universal Guide comes already packed with various streaming services, so you won't have to install much separately. It is intuitive enough, meaning you'll probably have no issues navigating the guide.

Long story short, the Samsung QN55Q80RAFXZA leaves very little room for complaints. Some find the remote a little basic but that's not necessarily something we'd complain about.

Samsung (QN55Q80RAFXZA) [Q80 Series] 55-Inch QLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model) in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


 

TCL (65R625)

Egalitarian Platform

TCL 65R625 has its flaws but these flaws are not enough to challenge the model's stance among the best budget OLED TVs. It is pretty ridiculous how much this product is packing and how good its performance is relative to the TV's budget price tag.

On the aesthetics front, we've conflicting opinions. On one hand, the brushed metal design looks bold and even somewhat imposing.

At the same time, the brushed chrome part around the outside bezel makes the screen look somewhat industrial, meaning that its profile won't be able to seamlessly blend into most modern settings.

The legs are quite chunky but, on the bright side, you can rely on these things to support the TV.

All things considered, this screen is relatively thick but not as thick as most OLED TVs within this price bracket.

As far as the product's smart platform is concerned, the TCL 65R625 relies on its predecessor's intuitive yet venerable and surprisingly egalitarian Roku TV.

The "egalitarian" part means that the platform has no bias towards specific streaming services, making sure to display search results from ~10 services, extending preferential treatment towards free content.

Since Roku has no ties to any major streaming services, you won't have to worry about this platform force-feeding you titans like Netflix/Amazon/Hulu and ignoring lesser-known channels like Pluto.tv, Crackle, and others.

Review of TCL (65R625) 65-Inch 4K QLED TV with HDR and Roku Smart TV (2019 Model)

Quantum Dot Filter

Despite the affordable price tag, the TV's 4K and HDR performance is no joke. Incorporating a Quantum Dot filter, the screen is able to reach peak brightness levels around 800 nits without producing noticeable haloing. Meanwhile, the controlled LEDs make sure that the colors are rich and vibrant.

Apart from these solutions, there's also the Wide Color Gamut (WCG) ensuring that the blues appear bluer, the greens look greener, and so on. The company's very own NBP Photon tech is able to do that without oversaturating the colors, producing results that most TVs within this price range do not even come close to replicating.

Of course, as we've stated above, this awesome television set has its flaws. Featuring a VA panel, the viewing angles are not exceptional, so off-axis viewing options are limited. Also, the two 8-watt down-firing speakers are pretty quiet and unable to provide especially impressive bass frequencies.

Even taking these into account though, the TCL 65R625 puts most affordable OLED TVs to shame. Performance-wise, this TV will be able to tussle with much more expensive screens.

TCL (65R625) 65-Inch 4K QLED TV with HDR and Roku Smart TV (2019 Model) in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


 

Samsung (QN55Q60RAFXZA) [Q60 Series]

The Door to Flagship TVs

The Samsung QN55Q60RAFXZA has been referred to as a door to Samsung's flagship TVs and we can see where the people making this reference are coming from. Sure, the product has its flaws but they're negligible when you put the screen's price into perspective.

Starting with the model's design, the bezels are slim, while the U-shaped legs comfortably sit under the screen. In fact, the entire TV is pretty slim, so you can mount this thing onto most walls without worrying about space. The legs are made from relatively flimsy plastic that might snap/chip, so we would definitely recommend looking into wall-mounting.

The product is so slim compared to most OLED TVs because the people behind this screen went with an edge-lit design rather than the full-array lighting setup that most high-end and mid-range OLED models use these days. That means that the TV is unable to get as bright as its full-array counterparts.

No sacrifices have been made regarding the TV's smart platform though. Adopting Tizen, easily one of the fastest, most responsive operating TV systems, the model makes its settings and various tools/features easily accessible. You'll be able to easily switch between Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu, and more.

Review of Samsung (QN55Q60RAFXZA) [Q60 Series] 55-Inch QLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model)

Smooth Motion

Even though the TV features the same 4K native resolution that most OLED TVs these days come fitted with, generally speaking, people use these TVs to watch HD and SDR content (live cable, OTA broadcasts, various non-4K content from different streaming services) more often than not.

That's precisely why the TV's edge-lit profile is not as bad as one might think. You don't need especially high brightness to make these formats look good. All you need is decent upscaling tech and this TV more than delivers in this department.

Using the company's Quantum processor, the screen incorporates sophisticated AI algorithms that fill in the details when upscaling from SDR/HD to 4K. These algorithms are able to make upscaled visuals look crisp and clear.

At the same time, the TV's motion handling is better than most OLED models' within this price bracket, ensuring smooth playback, all while making sure that the dialogue scenes do not have that soap opera effect.

On the sound front, the two 10-watt speakers are not necessarily something to write home about but the AI-controlled Intelligent Audio tech does solid work elevating the mids and adding clarity to the dialogue.

In closing, the Samsung QN55Q60RAFXZA is unable to compete with the company's flagship models since those cost more than double the price but the TV will have no issues bumping heads with any OLED TV within its price segment.

Samsung (QN55Q60RAFXZA) [Q60 Series] 55-Inch QLED 4K Smart TV with HDR (2019 Model) in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer


 

What Is an OLED TV?

OLED TVs use organic LEDs to eliminate the pixels individually. We've covered the differences between these TVs and LCD panels in the OLED vs LED/LCD section, so we won't be focusing here on what makes these TVs better than most standard screens.

Apart from everything we've discussed and reviewed there, OLED models are usually packing various solutions to neutralize the technology's unimpressive peak brightness and different modes to let you manage and manipulate the TVs' often numerous settings and features.

Although people do not usually use these expensive TVs with desktop computers, the necessary interfaces are always there. Plus, sometimes, these screens even come equipped with G-Sync/FreeSync support to ensure smooth gameplay with very little pixel distortion. When that's the case, the mentioned screens might even be packing gaming monitors' techs and features like Dynamic Black Equalizer and so on.

Although OLED models usually come equipped with decent speakers, we would still recommend looking into these floor speakers to match the awesome visuals with equally impressive stereo.

What Features to Compare

Size and Resolution

OLED TVs are still TVs, meaning that things begin with the screen's size and resolution. As you would imagine, you can choose any size you want (from the usually long available list), as long you keep in mind that the more sizable panels cost more and you'll have to figure out where to put the newly purchased massive screen.

The gold standard last few years seem to have become ~60-inch panels (plus-minus 5 inches). The biggest reason why that's the case is because it's the perfect size to support the Ultra HD 4K resolution, large enough to see the difference between the increased number of pixels but not too large to make those pixels massive and individually identifiable.

Motion Rate

This is where things get somewhat tricky. Sure, there's no downside to having the most ludicrous motion rate (above 200 hertz).

The issue here is that, first, these motion rates are partially bogus/intentionally misleading.

Second, you'll be watching movies, TV series, and YouTube clips on these screens, meaning that the content will be 24/24/<60 fps respectively. In other words, the screen might be refreshing 200 times per minute but the footage was not filmed with matching frame rates, so the TV will be refreshing the same pictures.

Sure, you can hook up these speedy TVs to expensive desktop rigs and play Fortnite/League of Legends/Overwatch at 200+ frames per second, that's where the screen's motion rate will prove beneficial but that's about it.

Smart TV

Even the least expensive OLED TVs cost about as much as mid-range LCD models, meaning that smart platforms are somewhat expected here and, more often than not, present. Roku TV, Tizen, and LG's webOS are arguably the best platforms since these do not prioritize subscription-based services before free ones.

Interfaces

There's nothing different here compared to most modern-day TVs. Generally speaking, OLED models come equipped with 3-4 HDMI ports, 2-4 USB ports, and the entire standard lineup, including Bluetooth, an Ethernet port (RJ-45), an Optical output, and more.

Sound

As we've already concluded, OLED panels are much more expensive compared to LCD TVs, meaning that these panels are usually adopting robust speakers. More often than not, these speakers are pretty good at separating lows, mid, and highs. Also, the more expensive models are packing superb bass response with excellent impact and solid extension.

OLED vs LED/LCD

More often than not, people are choosing between OLED and LED/LCD TVs these days (there are also QLED and such but we'll leave those since they're not as different and prevalent as these panels). The issue here is that these acronyms can bamboozle even some tech-savvy folk, let alone those customers who are not into these things. That's why we've decided to break down the differences between these panels and emphasize the screens' strengths and weaknesses.

OLED

Generally speaking, most customers switch from LCD and plasma TVs to OLED models, not vice versa. When that's the case, these customers seldom go back since the smooth and fluid yet, at the same time, vibrant and contrasty visuals are stunning initially. Also, these screens are usually as flat as wallpapers. How do these flat TVs work though?

Incorporating organic light-emitting diodes (OLED), these TVs are able to emit their own light, meaning that the backlighting issue is that there anymore. Also, OLED displays illuminate each and every pixel separately, meaning that you're able to manage the visuals at an individual pixel level.

Placing organic films between the screen's semiconductors and supplying them with an electrical current, the people behind these TVs let you switch the pixels on and off individually. The solution enables creating more brightness using less power and even makes total black possible.

These organic LEDs make the footage that features both complete darkness and extreme brightness (like star-filled night skies) look much more realistic than when LCD models reproduce the same footage. Of course, with unlimited contrast, the TV is able to produce the darkest blacks, the whitest whites, and everything in-between.

Last but not least, as the organic part suggests, these screens are more environmentally friendly than LCD TVs. The difference here is that you need to use the Nitrogen Trifluoride greenhouse gas to produce LCD models, which is not the case with OLED panels.

So, what are the downsides? Well, first and foremost, OLED TVs are usually much more expensive. Apart from that, the tech is relatively new, so we've no idea how long these panels last.

LCD

LCD panels have been around for quite some time now. As some people are already aware, these TVs use liquid crystals rotating polarized light, effectively acting as this light valve that illuminates all pixels at the same time.

More often than not, these TVs are really bright (provided you're not going with TN panels). The issue is that the brightness is uniform, making the visuals less realistic since that's not the case in real life. Also, these screens have limited contrast ratio, meaning that the blacks are not always that black and that the most extreme whites are not always accessible. The shadows are seldom as detailed too.

Aside from excellent brightness though, these TVs have upsides too, starting with the much more affordable price and ending with the fact that the colors are usually pretty rich and vivid.

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Publish Date: 2020-02-11 11:55:47