Best Music Keyboards for Musicians and Composers

Review & Comparison, Last Update December 29, 2021
A music keyboard is an essential part of every band, along with lead/bass guitar and drums, they allow playing, composing, and arranging music. The selection of music keyboards is wide, there are several types of them, designed for different goals and skill levels. Check out these 5 best music keyboards to find your perfect instrument. ...Read more ...Read less
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BEST 2021
PROS
CONS
OUR VERDICT
Keyboard (Type/Mechanics)
Effects and Presets
Display
Interfaces
Power
Size & Weight
Accessories
Warranty
 
PROS

The company's app can automatically turn the pages. The app will also let you record audio and the voice. The Fingering Guide button will display the correct finger placement. The Waiting mode will illuminate the keys responsible for the right notes and wait for you to hit these keys before transitioning to the next note. 

CONS

The stand is pretty flimsy. 

OUR VERDICT

Switching from a music keyboard to a piano can be difficult, even with ample experience. When you have been playing the Yamaha EZ-220 though, the transition should come naturally. Aside from teaching you piano, this device will also imprint proper technique upon you, so you will not have to relearn the basics.

detailed parameters
Keyboard (Type/Mechanics)

Full-sized piano-style keyboard, 61 LED-lighted keys

Effects and Presets

32

Display

392 tones

Interfaces

AC or 6 x "AA" batteries

Power

Headphones out, Pedal jack, USB port

Size & Weight

37.2 x 13.7 x 4.4 inches

9.7 lbs

Accessories

Power supply, Stand, Headphones

Warranty

1 year

PROS

Using the Dance Music Mode, you can mix things up with drum loops, add synth parts, play with different basslines, experiment with generous pre-installed sound effects, and customize transitions. The MySetup button will let you save settings so that you can recall tones and rhythms at a moment's notice. 

CONS

The sound quality isn't the best.

OUR VERDICT

The Casio Casiotone 61-Key Portable Keyboard will accommodate aspiring DJs as much as beginners learning the piano ropes. With its accurate integrated metronome, automatic accompaniment, and 10 different reverb types, this device will make the learning curve a lot less steep.

detailed parameters
Keyboard (Type/Mechanics)

Full-sized piano-style keyboard, 61 keys

Effects and Presets

48

Display

400 tones

Interfaces

AC or 6 x "AA" batteries

Power

Headphones out, Audio in, Pedal jack, USB port

Size & Weight

36.6" x 10.1" x 2.9"

7.3 lbs

Accessories

Power supply

Warranty

1 year

PROS

Using the Dual mode, you'll be able to layer multiple sounds. The Split mode will allow you to split two separate sounds across the keyboard. The stool is height-adjustable, with 3 height settings accommodating short and tall pianists alike. The headphones will let you practice without disturbing the people around you. 

CONS

The controls are a little confusing. 

OUR VERDICT

Despite its budget disposition, the Alesis Melody 61 MKII sounds quite respectable. Integrating 300 tones/accompaniment rhythms, this keyboard covers a wide instrument variety, imitating pianos, guitars, strings, percussion instruments, and more. The supplied bench offers ample cushioning.

detailed parameters
Keyboard (Type/Mechanics)

Full-sized piano-style keyboard, 61 keys

Effects and Presets

Not listed

Display

300 tones

Interfaces

AC or 6 x "AA" batteries

Power

Headphones out, Microphone in

Size & Weight

37.4 x 12.4 x 4.1 inches

11 lbs

Accessories

Power supply, Stand, Stool, Headphones, Microphone

Warranty

1 year

PROS

The LED-lighted keys provide visual stimulation so that you can learn quicker. Despite its compact profile, the keyboard features an ergonomic layout with generous spacing, minimizing misclicking. The piano stickers will make reading the music a little less challenging. 

CONS

The integrated speakers are not very loud. 

OUR VERDICT

The Best Choice Products 61-Keys Beginners Electronic Keyboard Piano Set is an attractive product in multiple respects. The keyboard sounds sweet, the teaching modes are easily digestible, the stand and the bench will let you practice anywhere, with 6 AA batteries enabling comfortable long-term portable use.

detailed parameters
Keyboard (Type/Mechanics)

Full-sized piano-style keyboard, 61 LED-lighted keys

Effects and Presets

Not listed

Display

255 tones

Interfaces

AC or 6 x "AA" batteries

Power

Headphones out, Microphone in, USB port

Size & Weight

33 x 10.5 x 3 inches

~8 lbs

Accessories

Power supply, Stand, Stool, Headphones, Sticker sheet

Warranty

60 days

PROS

Weighing 7 pounds, this keyboard is easy to relocate. Between 255 timbres, 65 percussions, and variable traditional piano and organ feels, this device will accommodate countless styles and genres. You can choose between single-fingered and fingered auto-bass chords and add sound effects.

CONS

The keys are a tad too sensitive. 

OUR VERDICT

The Hamzer 61-Keys Digital Music Piano Keyboard comes packing more features than even some premium models. Using these features, the device enables creating the most layered compositions, so even intermediate-level players will find this keyboard quite appealing.

detailed parameters
Keyboard (Type/Mechanics)

Full-sized piano-style keyboard, 61 keys

Effects and Presets

Not listed

Display

255 tones

Interfaces

AC or 6 x "AA" batteries

Power

Headphones out, Microphone in

Size & Weight

33.5 x 13 x 4 inches

7 lbs

Accessories

Power supply, Microphone, Sticker sheet

Warranty

Amazon's 30-day return policy

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Yamaha EZ-220 61-keys

From the Industry's Titan

The Yamaha EZ-220 does not mess around, which is not surprising considering that we're talking about an industry titan. Being practically synonymous with music keyboards, Yamaha knows the ins and outs that separate quality products and middling analogs. With this one, we're talking primarily about the 61 touch-sensitive keys that light up displaying the correct notes, making the lessons engaging and easy to follow along. With these keys, the 'board lets you produce 392 instrument voices and over 100 accompaniment styles, playing synthesizers, guitars, drums, strings, brass, and more. Meanwhile, the aforementioned preset styles will be acting as virtual bands so that you can play different genres along with them.

What we like the most is probably the proprietary modes though. With the Listen and Learn mode, the keyboard illuminates the keys you need to hit first, so you can play without following the book. The Timing mode, on the other hand, will be lighting up the keys for each hand, so you can learn one hand at a time. While the mode will be illuminating the keys that represent one hand, the keyboard will be hitting the notes that the second hand should be playing at the time. Last but not least, the Waiting mode will also be illuminating the responsible keys, except that, with this mode, the keyboard will be waiting for you, so even those people that learn at the slowest pace can learn without the instrument rushing them.

Review of Yamaha EZ-220 61-keys Portable Keyboard Package with Headphones, Stand and Power Supply

Portable Grand and Fingering Guide

With music keyboards, as much as the device matters, one would argue that the company's app that utilizes the device matters about as much. In this case, we're dealing with Yamaha's Page Turner app, featuring 100 preset songs and, true to its name, turning the pages automatically so that you can focus on the music instead. Besides that, the app can record the audio and even the voice.

Still, with Yamaha, even though the app is fine, it is the digital instrument that is the biggest responsible party. To some extent, the party relies upon the Fingering Guide feature, displaying the correct finger placement so that newbies can not only hit the notes but also build proper technique. To some extent, the Portable Grand feature is what matters here, with a single dedicated button bringing up a piano that sounds rich and authentic.

Bottom line, with the Yamaha EZ-220, making the switch from a music keyboard to a piano will prove the easiest, most natural transition you can make.

Yamaha EZ-220 61-keys Portable Keyboard Package with Headphones, Stand and Power Supply in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer

Last updated price $190.43
Stock In stock
ASIN B009115NPG

 

Casio Casiotone

A More Luggable Case

The Casio Casiotone 61-Key Portable Keyboard is a curious case. First, the name is a little odd. Sorry, guys, but you can do better than that. Second, the integrated speakers aren't that great. Of course, people normally use these keyboards with headphones anyway, but the instrument's sound could use some improvement. Still, despite these shortcomings, the model is a pretty respectable music keyboard.

To start with, this device features 400 inbuilt tones and 75 rhythms, so you can make that first mixing step without initial browsing. To add more, this newbie-oriented musical instrument also comes equipped with 10 reverb types, which means that you'll be able to spice things up/add depth to the track, again, without looking elsewhere beforehand.

But, before that, though the keyboard might not always play the part, looking the part is where the model holds strong. On the one hand, there's nothing especially fancy sticking out but, in a way, that's also what elevates the device's appearance. In plain English, it looks professional without also looking timid and uninspired. You can go with black or white but, as far as we're concerned, the red option will let you make the biggest splash.

More than that, considering the built-in carry handle, this is the most luggable 61-key music keyboard we've reviewed yet. Naturally, the handle is not the whole story here. Otherwise, that 'luggable' remark would be an understatement. Working alongside the integrated handle will also be the keyboard's size and weight. At 36.6 x 10.1 x 2.9 inches and ~7.3 pounds, this is one compact and lightweight specimen. With it, 'taking inspiration to go' takes on a whole new meaning or, at the very least, on a more portable meaning.

Review of Casio Casiotone 61-Key Portable Keyboard with USB

Dance Music Mode

You can make an argument that music keyboards are only as good as the software they're compatible with. In this case, we're working with Casio's Dance Music Mode. Using this mode, even complete beginners should have no trouble creating and remixing EDM tracks. You can select the style and, using the keys, swap between triggering drum loops, synth parts, basslines, different effects, transitions, you name 'em.

Closing things up, this device comes outfitted with a class-compliant USB interface. Using this interface, the keyboard can be paired with any PC, laptop, Mac, iOS, or Android-centered device without fiddling with drivers.

To sum it up, the Casio Casiotone 61-Key Portable Keyboard is something you can gift an aspiring DJ without worrying that they might not like it.

Casio Casiotone 61-Key Portable Keyboard with USB in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer

Last updated price $119.00
Stock In stock
ASIN B07VSTXH3V

 

Alesis 61-Keys

A Whole Package

The Alesis Melody 61 MKII proves that learning piano, albeit a huge time investment, doesn't have to also be an enormous financial investment. More often than not, aside from the music keyboard, you need multiple accessories to play with learn and play with comfort. These accessories can include a stand, stool/bench, power adapter, microphone, and more.

As luck would have it, these are also the accessories that come with this 'board, which is an awesome surprising considering that, even without them, this would have been an affordable and attractive product, with decent integrated speakers and 300 embedded tones covering the widest instrument variety, including pianos, synthesizers, guitars, percussion instruments, woodwinds, strings, even different sound effects. What's more interesting though is that the device, with the Dual mode, also enables learning layering multiple sounds. Sweeting an already sweet spot, this keyboard comes featuring a Split mode. This mode lets you split two sounds across the 'board.

With its one-touch song mode functionality, the Melody 61 MKII lets you easily access the 300 sounds and accompaniment rhythms that we were discussing above, creating songs and, with the 40 integrated demo songs, playing along too. Sometimes, affordable music keyboards do not let you record your songs but, using the Record mode, this device will let you do so without facing any challenges.

Review of Alesis 61-Keys Keyboard with Speakers, Headphones, Microphone, Stand, Music Rest and Stool

Protecting the Tuchus

We've been saying that the whole package is what makes this product attractive and not just the keyboard but haven't even addressed a single thing about this product except for the keyboard, so it is probably high time to right that wrong. First, the package includes a stand that you can easily assemble within ~2 minutes tops, keeping the 'board steady and letting you play without utilizing any pre-existing surfaces that you may or may not have available to you.

To go with the stand, the company also sends you this nice little stool, doubling as a piano bench and, with three adjustable height settings, accommodating the shortest as well as the talents aspiring pianists. Plus, the bench offers ample cushioning, so you can play for hours without hurting your tuchus. They even send you a microphone so that you can sing along without purchasing one separately and comfy headphones with decent sound.

In short, the Alesis Melody 61 MKII is the biggest, most complete package. With this one, you will not have to purchase a single accessory separately.

Alesis 61-Keys Keyboard with Speakers, Headphones, Microphone, Stand, Music Rest and Stool in the use

Additional Info

User Manual     Manufacturer

Last updated price $141.17
Stock May be out of stock
ASIN B07987K4F5

 

Best Choice Products 61-Keys Beginners

LED-Lighted Keys

Ironically, products from companies with names like Best Choice Products usually disappoint. This is not the usual case though. No, this keyboard from Best Choice Products does not disappoint. We're not crazy about the embedded speakers, with them being a little too quiet. Apart from that, this full-sized piano-style keyboard easily tussles with premium models. Matching these premium models, 'the board adopts 61 LED-lighted keys, illuminating to display the right key. Between these keys, the device contributes 255 timbres and 255 rhythms, imitating everything from classical music to pop, rock, and more.

These tones also include multiple sound effects, so you can experiment with different instruments and create unique tracks. Not unlike most music keyboards nowadays, this model integrates 50 demo songs that serve as an excellent starting point, engaging beginners without overwhelming them. Keeping the starting tempo at 120 BPM, the 'board familiarizes you with standard pianos, with 32 keyboard percussion sounds offering decent variety.

Of course, these keyboards are seldom complete without teaching modes. In this case, we're offered One-Key, Follow, and Ensemble modes, with the names already providing sufficient description. In addition to these modes, you will also have piano stickers, so reading music will feel a little less daunting initially.

Review of Best Choice Products 61-Keys Beginners Electronic Keyboard Piano Set w/LCD Screen, Headphones

Even More Compact

Fitting the standard 61 keys, controls, and timbre/sound instructions is almost impossible without making the device fairly sizable too. Still, with some effort, you can shave an inch here and there, something that the people behind this keyboard have managed with almost unparalleled success. Measuring just 33 x 10.5 x 3 inches, the 'board is a lot more compact than its contemporaries but, what's even more impressive, the device still offers decent key separation, keeping the layout ergonomic and the spacing between the controls quite generous. Plus, the keyboard weighs just 8 pounds, enabling hassle-free relocation.

Last but not least, what we have here is not just a music keyboard but a full-blown piano set, including a power adapter, stand, stool, headphones, and the aforementioned sticker sheet. As you can imagine, these accessories let you learn piano anywhere, even in a room with no furniture at all.

In closing, the Best Choice Products 61-Keys Beginners Electronic Keyboard Piano Set will let you customize the sound, learning and playing without adhering to strict rules.

Best Choice Products 61-Keys Beginners Electronic Keyboard Piano Set w/LCD Screen, Headphones in the use

Additional Info

    Manufacturer

Last updated price $139.99
Stock In stock
ASIN B07YXXZLCM

 

Hamzer 61-Keys

More Features than Premium Models

The people at Hamzer are saying that this piano keyboard produces tremendous, even flawless sound. This is pretty subjective though, so talking about its sound is not something we're interested in doing. What's not subjective and what we are interested in doing is addressing its 255 tones/timbres, 61 keyboard percussions, and 24 demo songs. Between them, this device enables creating complex, layered music, making the 'board suitable for beginners as well as for intermediate-level players. Not unlike most music keyboards, the model adopts 61 keys. However, unlike these keyboards, the one we're discussing here lets you choose between traditional piano or organ feels, keeping the acoustic experience more versatile and, to some people, a lot more exciting.

In the same vein, this device allows you to switch between single-fingered and fingered auto-bass chords, so you can also experiment with different styles. You can select the chord timbre, program and edit rhythms, and even utilize multiple effects like vibrato, ensemble, and sustain.

Because intermediate players can find even these a little underwhelming as well, this keyboard further sweetens the pot, including rhythm sync, rhythm fill-in, tempo adjustment, accompanying volume adjustment, and more. Using these controls/features, you can create unique music that most instruments will not be able to replicate, even when played by experienced musicians.

Review of Hamzer 61-Keys Digital Music Piano Keyboard with Microphone and Sticker Sheet

The Most Lightweight Too

Taking into account the practically endless feature list, the product's affordable price becomes a little suspicious. To some extent, the price is what it is because this is not Yamaha. To some extent, the responsible party is the keys. To be a little more precise, the keys are a little sensitive, that's one. They're also not LED-lighted, that's two. These are not the biggest downsides but also not negligible mishaps.

What is a negligible mishap is that the button layout is a little inconvenient. However, what's not inconvenient and probably the reason why the button layout is how it is would have to be the model's size. Capping at 33.5 x 13 x 4.7 inches, this is the second most compact keyboard on the list and, weighing just 7 pounds, the most lightweight model within this selection. Even little kids should be able to pick this 'board up and carry it from room to room.

Cutting to the chase, the Hamzer 61-Keys Digital Music Piano Keyboard is the most feature-rich budget music keyboard on the market today, making this choice a pretty easy one.

Hamzer 61-Keys Digital Music Piano Keyboard with Microphone and Sticker Sheet in the use
Last updated price $76.29
Stock In stock
ASIN B01H5M9OKM

 

What Is a Music Keyboard?

An electronic musical keyboard is an instrument visually resembling a portable piano. Speaking technical terms, it produces sound by mixing one or several sound wave generators. Digital keyboards do this by using processor settings whereas analog ones deal with adjusting the electric signal properties. However, in contrast to a conventional piano, music keyboards often offer many additional functions from accompaniment features to connecting a microphone and adding your voice to the part and recording your music into the built-in memory or onto an SD card. They are really versatile.

One of the types of music keyboards is a digital piano on which we have a separate review if you're interested.

What Features to Compare

Music keyboards today are offered in a variety of types for people with different goals and needs. It is hardly necessary to buy an expensive work station with tons of bells and whistles for a complete beginner or a kid. Check out these parameters before setting off to make a purchase.

Intended Use

There are simpler music keyboards for those making their first steps in music. Some hi-end features might be sacrificed in favor of simplicity of use and the option to add educational apps, helping guides, a number of presets and tones, etc. On the other hand, if you have some skills already and use the keyboard to practice learning programs are of less importance, you'd probably prefer better sound quality and an option to adjust settings. If you compose or mix music, a good sound recording and a full set of keys is a must—in this case, a work station with the largest number of settings would be great.

Keybed Type

If you're into classic and aim for the feel as close to a conventional piano as possible, a weighted keybed with hammer action is your best bet, it'll sound and feel just like the real thing. Semi-weighted bed is also close to the traditional feel and it is also quite widespread, it works with instrumental effects as well as with digital ones. At the same time, synth action keybeds are great for fast playing and can usually be found on MIDI keyboards that work with digital effects.

Display and Interfaces

A display is a good addition, especially if you go for a work station with a blinding number of features. With a display, you will always see the current settings and sometimes it will even let you control them (if it's a touchscreen). An educational guide can also be displayed on the screen. As for the interfaces, a headphones port is necessary, of course, as you will be able to hear what you play better (and your neighbors won't nag you about the noise). You'll need a mic in if you plan on recording voices and ambient noise. With a USB port, connecting to your PC or laptop to transfer files will become faster and easier, not mentioning that you'll be able to use a synthesizer or a work station as a MIDI keyboard. With a sequencer and pads feature, it'll be possible to record parts of sound and assign them to buttons to create sequences for further use.

Portability

Portability becomes an issue if you're buying a musical keyboard for both home and outside practices as well as for performances. In this case, you'll have to move a lot and carry it around. You wouldn't really enjoy a bulky and heavy machine if you need to cross a city on your two feet or via public transportation. Likewise, for a portable model, it is important to have the option to use batteries as a power source in addition to a cord. Finally, a carrying case would be nice, too.

Differences Between Music Keyboards and Pianos

One can argue that the piano is the most complex music instrument, so starting with the piano, even when the end goal is learning to play the piano, is not always the smartest decision. At the same time, there are differences between music keyboards and pianos, so we cannot quite say that the former are the perfect precursor to the latter as well.

To start with, pianos use weighted keys, meaning that pressing them takes extra effort compared to keyboard keys. Even the least experienced players can feel the difference between the two types. That being said, unlike pianos, music keyboards are tremendously versatile, so you can play practically any genre, accommodating variable musical tastes. Playing classical music, blues, and jazz pieces on any piano is not an issue but playing anything else can be a little challenging since, as you would imagine, pianos are not that good at imitating different instruments.

But, adding to the previous argument, besides the plastic, non-weighted feel, the keys on music keyboards are usually smaller and thinner, making the transition from a keyboard to a piano a tad difficult at times. Of course, there are countless models available on the market right now, including models with weighted keys and with keys that match the average pianos'. Aside from that, pianos have 88 keys, ranging between A0 and C8. Music keyboards, on the other hand, usually cap at 61 keys, but employ different controls/settings that you can use to emulate the missing keys, including the pedals.

As much as we love pianos, the cost is where the contest between the two becomes uneven. See, above-average music keyboards cost as little as 150 bucks, with premium models capping at 300 bucks tops. Meanwhile, above-average pianos cost above 2,000 bucks, which is a huge investment as far as most people are concerned.

When it comes to transitioning from one instrument to the other, it is not always about preferences but, more often than not, about needs. Pianos are great, sure, but, in this case, great describes both the experience and the size. An average piano measures around 50 inches in height, 60+ inches in width, and ~25 inches in depth. To add more, even the smallest upright models weigh above 300 pounds, with big pianos reaching 600-800 pounds. In the meantime, music keyboards usually weigh less than 10 pounds and measure less than ~13 x 35 x 4 (HxWxD) inches, meaning that, when you're moving apartments, you can easily bring the keyboard with you, whereas the piano will always present considerable transportation challenges, not to mention the fact that the new place will often have no space for the piano anyway.

As far as the learning part is concerned, music keyboards are all about rhythm, speed, and finger placement. While pianos are about that life too, you will also have to learn the techniques required to play acoustic instruments in general. Plus, apart from the keys, you'll have to learn how to use the pedals, which is not something that comes naturally to most people.

FAQ:

Q: How is a music keyboard different from a piano?
A:
A piano is an acoustic instrument whereas musical keyboards are digital. The sound they make differ, as does the response of keys. Even with the most expensive keyboard you won't get a complete piano sound and feel.

Q: Should I really buy a keyboard instead of a piano?
A:
If you are looking for an option to place at home and alternate between it and the piano you use at your classic music school, a keyboard might not be a too good option due to the difference in size and sound. A keyboard will do as a temporary solution but hardly as a permanent one. However, for those aspiring to go into popular music and arrangement a keyboard is an obvious choice, it is smaller, lighter, more portable, and offers quite a number of features like mimicking other instruments, for example.

Q: What is a synthesizer? Is it the same as a music keyboard?
A:
Strictly speaking, a music keyboard is not the whole instrument but simply the part with keys. An instrument we are much too used to calling a music keyboard is actually called an electronic keyboard. Anyway, the synthesizer is a type of "music" keyboard designed mostly to create synthetic sounds. They are usually professional devices as opposed to simple music keyboards we buy for home practice and performances.

Q: What's a workstation?
A:
A work station is usually a hi-end music keyboard with a full set of keys (which is 88) and a wide range of additional features to not only play but compose music. They often offer multiple effects, tones, sequencing options, etc. It's a choice of professional or highly skilled performers. They can be rather costly and bulky.

Q: What is a MIDI?
A:
Originally, MIDI is a signal protocol used to connect your keyboard to a PC or to another instrument. A MIDI keyboard, however, is an instrument that works using this protocol. Simply put, a MIDI music keyboard does not create the sound as it is but reproduces it using the protocol signals and samples. It's the simplest music keyboard.

Q: Does it take as long to learn the music keyboard as it takes to learn a piano?
A:
 Well, most music keyboards have a display and some have special mobile apps that can quicken the process of learning significantly, but in the end, it all depends on how dedicated you are and how much time you spend practicing.

Sources:

1. Electronic keyboard, Wikipedia.

2. How to Buy a Keyboard, wikiHow.

3. Home Keyboard Buying Guide, Sweetwater.

4. Keyboard Buying Guide, eBay. March 3, 2016.

5. Pianos and Keyboards: How to Choose, THE HUB. July 13, 2016.

6. How to Buy a Keyboard, wikiHow.

7. Christopher Breen Choosing a musical keyboard, Macworld. February 13, 2012.

8. Brandy Kraemer 6 Considerations for Electric Keyboard Shopping, ThoughtCo. January 25, 2017.

9. Which should I choose: a portable keyboard or a MIDI keyboard controller? Quora.

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Publish Date: 2017-08-16 16:05:48